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An Approach to ICSE English provides a platform to contribute, discuss and comment on the various issues related to the study and practice of English for the students and teachers of ICSE syllabus. Even with its focussed nature, An Approach to ICSE English will be beneficial to everyone involved in the learning the niceties of the English language.

Showing posts with label Poetry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Poetry. Show all posts

Thursday, 2 December 2010

Poetry Study Aid: John Masefield-Laugh and Be Merry

Laugh and be MerryJohn Masefield
The poem 'Laugh and be merry' by John Masefield probes the premise of living life to the full. The poet advises that we should have a constructive outlook in life. Life is brief and it is not to be frittered away in sorrow and despair. He advocates us to get pleasure from our lives in this world, since the universe itself is a manifestation of the joyousness of God. Each instant of our life should be savoured and rejoiced. God created the moon and the stars for the happiness of human being. So we should be enlivened by God's purposeful creation. The poet compares the world with an inn where all human beings are temporary guests. We should enjoy life till it comes to an end and till the music of life ends. Laugh and be merry for the world is a much better place with a happy song and to live in a world that is ready to blow in the teeth of wrong. We should be always conscious of the injustice and wrong doings of the world and strive to remedy them so that the world will remain a happy place to live in for all. We must not just rejoice but also be dynamic in tackling evil. Laugh and give no leave to sorrow or to worries for the life is short, a thread a length of span. Laugh from the depth of your heart and with optimism and be proud to belong to the everlasting and spectacular procession of the human race; a pageant with an impressive display in celebration of life.

Tuesday, 20 April 2010

ICSE English Poetry Study Aid H L V Derozio The Harp of India

The Harp of India
Henry Louis Vivian Derozio
The Harp of India by H L V Derozio is a patriotic poem that pays a glorious tribute to the rich tradition of the art of Indian poetry which conveys the poet‘s deep anguish at the decline of the age of old art under the slavish shackles of British supremacy. Henry Louis Vivian Derozio was born in Calcutta [now Kolkata]. His father was Indo-Portuguese and his mother English. Though Derozio had very little of Indian blood in him, his upbringing in India greatly inspired in him Indian themes and sentiments. Derozio is generally regarded as the first Indian to write in English. Derozio’s poetic carrier was very short lasting only for about six years. Derozio, who held great promise as poet, unfortunately had premature death at the age of 23 when he was still at his prime. He is modern India’s first poet to give expression to his patriotism in verse, the first to sing of Freedom, the first to contemplate an intellectual renaissance for an ancient civilization through a new perception. In the poem The Harp of India the poet Derozio- an ardent admirer of India’s rich heritage, culture and tradition- laments the decline of the rich tradition of Indian literature during the period of British domination of India.

Tuesday, 23 March 2010

ICSE English Literature in English Poetry and Short Stories

Literature in English
(Two hours)

Answer to this Paper must be written on the paper provided separately.
You will not be allowed to write during the first 15 minutes.
This time is to be spent in reading the question paper.
The time given at the head of this Paper is the time allowed for writing the answers
Attempt one question each from Section A, B and C and any other two questions.
You should answer five questions in all.
All the questions carry equal marks.

girlballSection A
Poetry: The Golden Lyre
Question 1
Read the following extract and answer the questions given below:
They clicked their tongues,
With every movement that the scorpion made
his poison moved in mother’s blood, they said.
May he sit still, they said.
May the sins of your previous birth
be burned away tonight, they said.
May your suffering decrease
the misfortunes of your next birth.
May the sum of evil
balanced in this unreal world
against the sum of good
become diminished by your pain, they said.
a) Who clicked their come? Where are they now? Why are they there? How did they come there? Explain the comparison used to describe their arrival. [3]
b) Comment on the beliefs of the villagers that are expressed in the extract. [4]
c) Why does the poet repeat the phrase ‘they said.”? What effect does it produce? [2]
d) How was the mother finally relived of the pain? What was her reaction? What does the poet want to convey by making the react so? [3]
e) Elucidate on the theme of the poem. Apart from the theme of the poem what appealed to the most in the poem? Elaborate. [4]
Question 2
Read the following extract and answer the questions given below:
They, too, aware of sun and air and water,
Are fed by peaceful harvests, by war’s long winter starved.
Their hands are ours, and in their lines we read
A labour not different from ours.

Saturday, 23 January 2010

Poetry Study Aid Ode to Duty Wordsworth Part Two

The poem takes an autobiographical tone and Wordsworth becomes confessional. He admits that he was inexperienced and was unaware of the perils of trusting his own impulses blindly. Of course, he was not swept away by the winds of passion, yet he opted out to be his own guide committing his faith blindly on his own natural impulses. He has been leading a life of self-indulgence. He had often heard the call of Duty in his heart but on all those occasions, he deferred the carrying out of her summons. He had to turn his back on his life of self-indulgence to listen to the voice of Duty and he did not like to turn away. However, from now on Wordsworth will be different and he will serve Duty rigorously and subjugate himself to her stringent discipline.