An Approach to ICSE English provides a platform to contribute, discuss and comment on the various issues related to the study and practice of English for the students and teachers of ICSE syllabus. Even with its focussed nature, An Approach to ICSE English will be beneficial to everyone involved in the learning the niceties of the English language.

Sunday, 18 March 2018

Grammar Bytes: Such as

Such as
Usually, such as is used to present an example or examples of something we have referred to. When we introduce a list of examples, we use a comma before such as. However, if we present only one example, the coma is not used before such as.
1.     Junk foods, such as Pizza and Burger, are not good for health.
2.     We are planning to visit a historic monument such as Charminar this summer.
We can use like instead of such as to present examples; but in formal contexts such as is always preferred.
Ú Nota bene
1.     Do not use only as to present examples:
People like tearjerker dramas, such as The Lady with the Broom and The Weeping Widow.
Not: as The Lady with the Broom and The Weeping Widow
2.     Do not use such as to compare things:
The school children wore Khaki coloured uniforms like the military uniforms.
Not:  such as the military uniforms.

Saturday, 17 March 2018

Grammar Bytes: Prepositions:

¢ Annoyed
1.     He was extremely annoyed about the damage to his car.
2.     He was annoyed at me for coming late.
3.     The passengers were annoyed by the baby’s continual coughing.
4.     Rama annoys everyone in temple by praying loudly.
5.     The boy was annoying the teacher with his continuous questions.
6.     My father was annoyed with me for failing in Geography.

¢ upset
1.     The children were feeling upset by the disturbing situation.
2.     Do not get upset about it.
3.     Do not let the situation upset you.
4.     John was too upset to speak to her.
5.     My mother was upset that I didn't call.
6.     Juliet was so upset with Romeo, she didn't talk to him for a month.

Grammar Bytes : which / that

which / that
 Many get confused in the right use of which and that. We find that changing which to that can totally change the meaning of a sentence.
Consider the following examples.
1.     My car, which is red, goes very fast.
2.     My car that is red goes very fast.
The first sentence tells us that I have just one car, and it is red. The clause which is red provides extra information, but it doesn’t change the meaning of the sentence.
The second sentence indicates that I have more than one car, and among my cars the red-coloured car goes very fast.
The phrase that is red is called a Restrictive Clause because another part of the sentence (My car) depends on it. We cannot remove that clause without changing the meaning of the sentence.
The first sentence using which just informs that my car is red. We can remove the clause which is red without missing any important information. The phrase which is red is called a Non- Restrictive Clause.
My car, which is red, goes very fast.
My car goes very fast.